A Christian Liberal Arts University, Est. 1846

Online Education Courses

EDU 110 History & Philosophy of Education in America (3 credits)

Course Description

The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how philosophy and worldviews have impacted education in America. The course emphasizes the influences of the Christian faith on education. Much of this influence has been within the public school system.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Understand the historical development of the most important philosophical and historical movements in American education.
  • Understand how worldviews affect the kind of education children receive in the public schools.
  • Provide a Christian critique of some aspect of American public education.
  • Produce a philosophical framework and practical guide for how Christians teach in the public schools.
  • Understand the significant role of Christianity in the development of education in America.
  • Understand the current philosophical atmosphere in public schools with the rise of postmodern philosophy.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 8 assignments and no exams.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment is worth between 50-100 points, for a total of 500 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Tim McAboy

MA, University of Kentucky, 1999
BA, Spring Arbor University, 1995

EDU 115 Teaching about Religion in Public Schools (3 credits)

Course Description

Teaching about religion in public schools is constitutional and necessary for a sound education. Teaching about religion is not religious indoctrination or religious devotional exercises; it is fair and objective presentation of the history and beliefs of religions and the study of the influence of religion on human society. This course examines the historical, constitutional and scholarly foundations for such teaching. It explores how teachers can practically incorporate teaching about religion into their classes in a constitutionally and age-appropriate manner.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the development of religious liberty from the 1500s to the present.
  • Identify the important constitutional cases having to do with religion in the public schools.
  • Articulate and analyze the arguments of various people and organizations on the debate over religion in public schools.
  • Summarize current law with reference to religion in public schools and articulate his/her view of the role of the Christian in public education.
  • Describe the various philosophical contexts in the debate over religion in public schools.
  • Articulate a Christian view of religious liberty and relation of church and state using biblical and Christian perspectives.
  • Demonstrate practically how the study of religion can be included in the school curriculum.
  • Critique curriculum or textbook presentations for their religious content.
  • Identify and evaluate resources that will assist him/her in further incorporation of religious topics into his/her curriculum.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 9 assignments and no exams.

Learning Evaluation

The assignments range in points from 25 to 100, for a total of 500 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Tim McAboy

MA, University of Kentucky, 1999
BA, Spring Arbor University, 1995

EDU 223 Supervised Early Childhood Education Field Experience (4 credits)

Course Description

  • To give the students who are completing the Associate of Arts degree in Early Childhood Education the opportunity to be involved in an early childhood setting, on a daily basis.

Learning Results

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Textbooks

There are no textbooks required.

Learning Documentation

This course consists of ten video conferences with the professor, 64 hours of observation in an early childhood classroom, a daily journal, a case study on one child in the classroom, and three written lesson plans.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment is worth between 5 and 10 points, for a total of 100 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Tim McAboy

MA, University of Kentucky, 1999
BA, Spring Arbor University, 1995

EDU 260 Educational Psychology (3 credits)

Course Description

This course focuses on the study and application of learning theories and psychological concepts & principles to the teaching-learning process. Some topics include developmental stages, age-level characteristics of students, gender differences, learning styles, contemporary views of intelligence, effects of ethnicity & social class on teaching and learning, principles of multicultural education, the teacher’s role in accommodating special needs in the regular classroom, learning theories, various instructional approaches, theories of motivation, and various types of assessment (including standardized and high-stakes tests). There is an emphasis on reflective teaching and learning.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Discuss teaching models and theories of learning
  • Explain, compare, and contrast developmental theorists.
  • Explain how children learn and develop intellectually, socially, emotionally, and physically. (INTASC 2)
  • Explain how students differ in their approach to learning related to culture and socioeconomic status. (INTASC 3)
  • Define and apply principles of assessment. (INTASC 8)
  • Describe issues related to special education. (INTASC 3)
  • Write appropriate objectives and lesson plans.
  • Explain, analyze, and portray different approaches to teaching and learning.
  • Define and analyze issues related to motivation and achievement.
  • Learn to integrate and analyze the course material, theories, and issues from a Biblical worldview.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of assignments, journal entries, exams, reading and quizzes, and a final exam.

Learning Evaluation

The assignments are each worth 10-25 points, the journal entries are worth 7-10 points each, the exams are each 50 points, the reading/quizzes are worth 100 points, and the final exam is worth 75-100 points. There is also an online folder worth 20 points which is due at the final, for a total of approximately 800 points for the class.

Faculty
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Dr. Carol Sisson

EdD, Regent University, 2006
EdS, Ball State University, 1991
MA, Ball State University, 1990
BA, Taylor University, 1988

EDU 290 Social Studies, Science and Math for the Preschool and Kindergarten Classroom (3 credits)

Course Description

The many areas of the child’s immediate world including development of positive self-concepts, which are then broadened to a worldview, are studied in this course. Various teaching approaches are utilized to help children become aware of the home, family, and aspects of cultural and ethnic influence within their communities and how these affect values, standards and morals within their homes and schools. The past, present, and future areas of science and mathematical readiness are all viewed as aids in developing this world view. Weekly observation of and participation with children in preschool, kindergarten, and Head Start classrooms help students become aware of meaningful teaching modes and methods of the areas covered in this course along with the wide range of student abilities within these classrooms.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the students will:

  • Gain knowledge of and the competencies needed to teach different areas and approaches of social studies, mathematical and scientific concepts to young children in the preschool/kindergarten classroom.
  • Develop an awareness of the methods needed to aid in developing children’s self-image, numberness, scientific concepts; including children of other cultures and those with various learning abilities.
  • Participate weekly in a field experience classroom that will help their understanding of how children differ in their approaches to learning. Each student will carefully create instructional opportunities in science, social studies and math for diverse learners within their classroom.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of reflective assignments, module summaries, two exams, a 5-day unit of study, and a 36-hour field placement in a preschool, Head Start, or Kindergarten classroom.

Learning Evaluation

Assignments are worth between 15 and 200 points, for a total of 780 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Cindy Tyner

EdD, Ball State University, 1996
MA, Ball State University, 1978
BS, Taylor University, 1976

EDU 371 Literature for Children & Adolescents (3 credits)

Course Description

The various genres of children's literature are explored through the communication modes of listening, writing, and speaking. Teaching methodologies in language arts are included. Literature dealing with diversity and special needs is included.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

  • Know, evaluate and appreciate the various genre of children’s and adolescent literature.
  • Immerse themselves into reading and responding to children’s and adolescent literature.
  • Utilize various genres of children’s and adolescent literature in the planning and instruction across disciplines that supports intellectual, social and personal development (INTASC 2).
  • Know various books of multicultural topics.
  • Present stories/books to a group of children (INTASC 10).
  • Apply the INTASC principles as they relate to successful teaching.
  • Apply the conceptual framework of Taylor University.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of children’s authors and illustrators as well as children’s book awards that impact the field of children’s literature.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of seven assignments and no exams.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment is worth 10 to 20 points with the exception of two that are 80 and 150 points accordingly, for a total of 310 points possible.

Faculty
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Susan Semer

MS, The Ohio State University
BS, The Ohio State University

SED 220 Exceptional Children (3 credits)

Course Description

This course is designed to prepare the teacher for the challenge of meeting the needs of exceptional children in the regular classroom. A general study of exceptional children focuses on mainstreamed and included special education students. Various topics included are identification of exceptional children, their characteristics and special needs, delivery of services, instructional methods and techniques, and evaluation.

Learning Results

The student will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge (In TASC 4) of:
    1. the connection between regular and special education.
    2. the relationship between inclusion and least restrictive environment (LRE).
    3. Major development theories (In TASC 1).
    4. Identification, eligibility and placement procedures for special education.
    5. Federal and state laws regarding special education.
    6. Multicultural and bilingual special education.
    7. Various categories of special education.
  • Demonstrate the ability to:
    1. Plan (In TASC 2 and 7) instruction appropriate to the needs of exceptional learners.
    2. Use various resources (In TASC 8) to meet the needs of exceptional learners.
    3. Interpret basic diagnostic information (IN TASC 6).
  • Demonstrate the attitude that:
    1. All children can learn and must be given appropriate instruction to foster learning.
    2. The teacher must model acceptance of all learners (IN TASC 2).
    3. The family/caregivers are essential partners in the development of all learners (In TASC 10).
    4. The input of all professionals is necessary to provide appropriate instruction for exceptional learners (In TASC 10).

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

The course consists of learning activities, 4 module assessments, a reflective interview, case study assessments, a research paper, and a final exam.

Learning Evaluation

Assignments are worth between 5 and 100 points, for a total of 667 points possible in the course.

Faculty
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Dr. Jeremy Mills

EdD, University of Kentucky, 2012
MA, Asbury University, 2003
BA, Asbury University, 2001

SED 330 Foundations of Special Education (3 credits)

Course Description

This course is an overview of the history and development of laws which mandate the provision of Special Education and related services to students with disabilities.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

  • Describe the major provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Family Education and Privacy Act, the No Child left Behind Act of 2001, and other federal and state laws affecting the education of students with disabilities ((CEC: ICC1K2, ICC1K5, ICC1K6).
  • Identify and explain the major litigation leading to the passage of the IDEA (CEC: ICC1K8, ICC1K9).
  • Develop legally sound policies and procedures with respect to special education in accordance with the legislation and litigation (CEC: ICC9K2, ICC9S1, ICC9S4, ICC9S6).
  • Identify and explain the major principles of the NCLB (CEC: ICC1K3).

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

The course consists of devotions, quizzes, powerpoint presentations, exams, and other various assignments.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment is worth between 5 and 100 points, with the midterm and final exam each worth 200 points, for a total of 1000 points in the course.

Faculty
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Tammy Mahon

EdD, Special Education, Ball State University MA, Special Education, Ball State University BA, Elementary Education, Anderson University