two students walk through Euler

Endowed & Annual Scholarships

Scholarships play a major role in providing necessary funding for Taylor students. More than 94 percent of the student body receives financial assistance from scholarships, grants, loans and work-study employment. These vital sources of funding come through both endowed and annual scholarships given by donors.

Endowed Scholarships

Giving to an Endowed Scholarship

  • Perpetuates the memory or legacy of a loved one
  • Honors those who have significantly influenced others as positive role models
  • Invests in training today’s students to be tomorrow’s Christian leaders

Endowed scholarships are designed to give annual awards to students indefinitely. The term endowed means that the gift from the donor is invested. A portion of the interest earned then provides yearly scholarships for students, while the original gift or principal is never used. Year after year, the remainder of the interest plus dividends and capital gains earned are reinvested so the principal grows. As the size of the principal grows, the interest earned also grows and provides larger amounts to award to students.

A minimum of $50,000 is needed as principal for at least one year before awards from an endowed scholarship can be given to students. Gifts of any size may be added to the fund in a span of five years in order to reach the $50,000 starting point. Estate gifts to an endowed scholarship do not have a time limit.

Annual Scholarships

Annual scholarships are funded by the generous gifts of Taylor donors. The amounts given by March 15 are directly awarded to students the following academic year. If a donor decides to stop funding an annual scholarship, the scholarship will not be awarded that year; however, it can be reinstated at any time. The amount given for an annual scholarship is flexible, but a $1,000 minimum is preferred.

Contact Michael Mortensen, Director of Scholarships (765.998.5114; mcmortensen@taylor.edu).

Lydia Bergevin ‘25 Thumbnail
Lydia Bergevin ‘25

Having lived in Mongolia as an MK (missionary kid), Lydia Bergevin cares deeply about global issues and longs to make a difference in the lives of children through foster care. “I want to go where God leads me, and I hope to use the tools and gifts God gives me to do that,” said Lydia.

As a first-year student, Lydia says her Taylor experience is impacting her in significant ways. “I just sense that people care deeply about me spiritually.”

Lydia is a recipient of the Carson-Myre scholarship. “Paying for an education is my responsibility,” adds Lydia. “I am here because of this scholarship.”