A Christian Liberal Arts University, Est. 1846

Online Social Sciences Courses

Psychology

PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)

Course Description

Introduction to Psychology is designed to provide you with a comprehensive survey of the field by introducing you to its major concepts, theoretical perspectives, and empirical findings.

Topics include worldviews in psychology, history of psychology, current perspectives in psychology, and models of integration of psychology and Christianity.

This course will provide you with a broader understanding of human behavior and how the field of psychology and its study affects our lives.  The topics speak to your own experiences and behavior, and will apply to real world events and issues.

Further, this course is designed for the purpose of laying the groundwork for the study of psychology.  It is intended to give you an understanding of the background and philosophical ideas that influence psychology today. 

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Define psychological perspective.
  • Discern how the psychological perspectives influence the collection and interpretation of
    psychological data.
  • Understand the importance of the history of psychology on the discipline today.
  • Understand important psychological concepts.
  • Evaluate psychological theories and date in light of biblical revelation.
  • Think about various psychological issues that Christians are concerned with.
  • Gain an appreciation of the application of psychology to everyday life.
  • Become knowledgeable consumers of scientific research in the field of psychology.

Textbooks

The course uses Macmillan Learning, LaunchPad: Psychology in Everyday Life (an online interactive program and e-text). The student will find specific instructions about ordering this resource within the syllabus.

Learning Documentation

The course utilizes various activities and reading in LaunchPad, as well as three papers.

Learning Evaluation

14 Unit Exams in LaunchPad are worth 50 points each, and three Involvement Activities (papers) are worth 100 points each, for a total of 1,000 points in the course.

Faculty
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Dr. Vance Maloney

PhD, Ball State University, 1989
MA, Ball State University, 1981
BA, Cedarville University, 1979

PSY 240 Child Psychology (3 credits)

Course Description

This course deals not only with the subject matter of development psychology (such as cognitive development, physical development, and socio-emotional development) but also attempts to apply the subject matter to those actively working with children such as parents, teachers, coaches, and others.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Explain and discuss the major developmental theories and identify which theorists are associated with the theories by incorporating the concepts into written assignments and by responding to exam questions regarding the theories and theorists.
  • Understand the child's physical, cognitive and psychosocial development during infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence as evidenced by responses on exam questions.
  • Critique David Walsh's Why Do They Act That Way? A Survival Guide to the Adolescent Brain for You and Your Teen, 2004, in a 3-4 page paper that will facilitate critical thinking.
  • Recognize and comment on his/her observations of three children in regard to the major developmental stages in a 3-6 page paper.
  • Apply information learned from the texts to his/her own life story by incorporating the concepts from the textbook in the autobiography.
  • Demonstrate understanding as to the importance of child and adolescent development to a variety of social science fields by responses to exam questions, as well as in the written assignments.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 5 assignments and 2 exams.

Learning Evaluation

The assignments account for a total of 500 points, and each exam is 100 points for a total of 700 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Marcia Wiinamaki

PsyD, George Fox College, 1993
MA, George Fox College, 1991
MEd, Southwest Texas State University, 1987
BA, Cedarville College, 1984

PSY 250 Lifespan Development (3 credits)

Course Description

This course is designed to provide a general overview of the developmental process in humans from conception through death and dying. Included is attention to the physical, cognitive, spiritual and psychosocial developments.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Explain and discuss the major theories of emotional and cognitive development and identify which theorists are associated with the theories.
  • Understand and recognize examples of theories of development in his/her own life and in others' lives through interviewing a senior citizen and writing a brief biography of that individual.
  • Choose a controversial topic in the textbook and be able to write an essay in defense of his or her position on that topic which includes spiritual and theological points of view.
  • Choose an issue within the lifespan category and write a research paper about that issue which incorporates the spiritual and theological viewpoint of the learner.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 5 assignments and 3 exams.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment and exam is worth 100 points for a total of 800 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Marcia Wiinamaki

PsyD, George Fox College, 1993
MA, George Fox College, 1991
MEd, Southwest Texas State University, 1987
BA, Cedarville College, 1984

PSY 272 Research in Psychology (3 credits)

Course Description

Research methods in psychology are studied and critiqued. Students are involved in practical research and writing assignments.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of research methods as a practical tool for life and work.
  • Apply biblical principles to the understanding of ethical principles in research.
  • Develop a plan for conducting research and generating a question.
  • Analyze and discuss practical issues for research planning.
  • Demonstrate foundational knowledge of measurement and sampling concepts.
  • Evaluate the general principles for conducting an experiment.
  • Investigate the efficacy of survey research and its application in professional and ministry settings.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of correlational studies and relationships.
  • Evaluate observational approaches to research and understand principles for studying complex human behavior.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 10 module assignments and one research project.

Learning Evaluation

Each module assignment is worth 100 points (each weighted at 7.5% of the final grade), and the research project is also worth 100 points (weighted at 25% of the final grade), for a total of 1,100 points in the course.

Faculty
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Dr. Terry Portis

EdD, Argosy University, 2003
MS, North Carolina A&T State University, 1996
BS, Covenant College, 1989

PSY 300 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)

Course Description

A study of the nature, causes and treatment of maladaptive behavior with special consideration given to the symptoms and dynamics of psychological disorders.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the historical background and research methods in abnormal psychology.
  • Use the DSM-IV as a basic tool to classify and understand the symptoms of various mental disorders.
  • Apply biblical principles to the understanding and treatment of abnormal behavior.
  • Read and write about the impact of stress on daily life and health.
  • Analyze and discuss anxiety and panic disorders, and biblical approaches to understanding and dealing with stress and anxiety.
  • Demonstrate foundational knowledge of mood disorders, somatoform, and dissociative disorders.
  • Evaluate the causes, consequences, and resources of eating disorders.
  • Discuss personality disorders and analyze their impact on everyday life and work.
  • Investigate substance abuse and dependence issues and evaluate treatment approaches, including the church’s role in ministering to people with substance-related disorders.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of sexual variants in modern society.
  • Evaluate the impact of sexual abuse and dysfunction.
  • Analyze the origin, treatments, and outcome of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.
  • Survey issues related to cognitive disorders and analyze their impact on older adults.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the common disorders of childhood including developmental disorders, and evaluate the role of church and community in assisting people with disabilities and their families.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 14 assignments and no exams.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment is worth 100 points, for a total of 1,400 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Terry Portis

EdD, Argosy University, 2003
MS, North Carolina A&T State University, 1996
BS, Covenant College, 1989

PSY 313 Statistics for Behavioral Science (3 credits)

Course Description

The major concepts covered in the class will be descriptive statistics, basic probability theory, and inferential statistics. Demonstrations of Microsoft Excel competency will be assigned for each segment of the class.

Learning Results

This course will enable the student to:

  • Understand basic statistical information contained in research papers.
  • Perform basic descriptive statistical operations on their own data.
  • Perform basic inferential statistical operations on their own data.
  • Think critically about the appropriateness of certain statistical tools for various methodological situations.
  • Draw appropriate conclusions from a variety of statistical analyses.
  • Connect principles learned in this class to various aspects of their Christian faith.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 8 assignments, which are divided into 4 modules, and 4 exams.

Learning Evaluation

Each module is worth between 20 and 40 points and the exams are 100 points each for a total of 530 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Paul Nesselroad

PhD, University of Louisville, 1998
MA, University of Louisville, 1993
BS, Asbury College, 1989

PSY 317 Psychology of Learning (3 credits)

Course Description

In this course the student will become acquainted with the major theories of the psychology of learning, along with basic biblical principles about humanity. Through personal investigation, observation, and basic research, students will learn to recognize and apply the theories of psychology of learning in their own lives as well as in the lives of others.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Explain and discuss the major theories of psychology of learning and identify which theorists are associated with the theories.
  • Understand and recognize examples of theories of psychology of learning in their own lives and others’ lives.
  • Design, implement and write up a basic research project that applies and investigates one or more theories in the psychology of learning.
  • Demonstrate understanding as to the relevance and importance of the psychology of learning to a variety of social science fields.
  • Apply concepts and principles of the major theories of psychology of learning as it relates to aspects of faith.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 5 assignments and 3 exams.

Learning Evaluation

Each requirement is worth 100 points, for a total of 800 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Marcia Wiinamaki

PsyD, George Fox College, 1993
MA, George Fox College, 1991
MEd, Southwest Texas State University, 1987
BA, Cedarville College, 1984

PSY 321 Social Psychology (3 credits)

Course Description

This class is designed to expose the student to the various topics of study related to social psychology.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

  • Be aware of the major theoretical models put forth to explain various social psychological phenomena.
  • Be aware of the major variables studied and the knowledge accumulated concerning these variables.
  • Be able to reflect upon how these models and knowledge impact their personal social lives and their worldview.
  • Be able to understand, at least at a surface-level, primary literature generated by researchers in the field.
  • Be able to detect and apply social psychological constructs to the social reality they experience.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 3 tests, a research report, and a social analysis paper.

Learning Evaluation

The tests are each worth 120 points, the research report is worth 100 points, and the social analysis paper is worth 40 points, for a total of 500 points in the course.

Faculty
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Dr. Paul Nesselroade

PhD, University of Louisville, 1998
MA, University of Louisville, 1993
BS, Asbury College, 1989

PSY 400 Theories of Personality (3 credits)

Course Description

A study of the major current systematic psychological theories of personality. Consideration is given to their underlying assumptions and usefulness for research and therapeutic process.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Define personality as the underlying cause within the person of individual behavior and experience.
  • Address three areas by personality theory: description, dynamics, and development.
  • Describe personality in terms of broad types or more numerous, and narrower, traits.
  • Gain an understanding of the importance of personal responsibility for self-development (including spiritual development) and community participation.
  • Consider the role that spirituality plays in the development of the healthy personality.
  • Evaluate and analyze prominent theoretical approaches to personality development utilizing psychological concepts, personal experience and understanding, and a Biblical worldview.
  • Develop an appreciation for cultural diversity by considering personality psychology principles across gender, ethnicity, and culture.

Textbooks

If you'd like an e-copy of the textbook, you can order it here: https://www.vitalsource.com/products/theories-of-personality-susan-c-cloninger-ph-d-v9780205974368

Learning Documentation

This course consists of 12 assignments and one final project.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment is worth 70 points with the final project worth 160 points, for a total of 1,000 points for the course.

Faculty
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Dr. Terry Portis

EdD, Argosy University, 2003
MS, North Carolina A&T State University, 1996
BS, Covenant College, 1989

PSY 461 Fundamentals of Counseling (3 credits)

Course Description

An analysis of the major theories and approaches to counseling, correlating them with counterpart theories of personality and learning. Each major theory will be dealt with in light of biblical revelation. As a result, the student is encouraged to formulate a tentative theory of counseling consistent with biblical truth.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of a worldview and its impact on a person's life and counseling.
  • Develop a biblical understanding of various theological concepts and their implication for the counselor and counseling process.
  • Understand the role of the counselor in the counseling process.
  • Understand the characteristics of an effective counselor
  • Utilize the Internet to learn about counseling organizations and resources.
  • Develop a personal theory of counseling.
  • Think critically about the various approaches to counseling.
  • Become familiar with specific techniques and approaches for counseling.

Textbooks
Faculty
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Dr. Terry Portis

EdD, Argosy University, 2003
MS, North Carolina A&T State University, 1996
BS, Covenant College, 1989

PSY 495 Integration of Psychology & Christianity (3 credits)

Course Description

An examination of the relationship between psychology and Christian beliefs about human nature. Topics involve the presuppositions of modern psychology, the Christian view of man and tension areas between psychology and theology.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the relationship of psychological science to theology.
  • Analyze and evaluate the assumptions and methods of modern psychology.
  • Discuss the relational patterns of psychology and theology.
  • Describe the limitations of psychological science.
  • Discover areas of faith and practice that might be strengthened through psychological science.
  • Describe the major models of integration of psychology and Christianity used by Christian psychologists.
  • Evaluate the major models of integration of psychology and Christianity used by Christian psychologists.
  • Think critically about the major tension areas between psychology and Christianity.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 11 assignments and 2 projects.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment and project must be completed and receive a passing score in order to complete the course. All requirements are worth 100 points each for a total of 1,300 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Terry Portis

EdD, Argosy University, 2003
MS, North Carolina A&T State University, 1996
BS, Covenant College, 1989

Sociology

ANT 200 Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)

Course Description

Comparative study of human cultures (past and present): technological, economical, political, religious, kinship, and family systems with examples from selected cultures throughout the world. Topics include cultural change, worldview and perception, and Christian applications such as cross-cultural communication of the gospel. The course will present a Christian perspective on anthropology and an anthropological perspective on Christianity.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Frame global issues within an anthropological framework of cultural relativism and historical particularism.
  • Explain cross-cultural concepts in terms of the major theoretical frameworks of anthropology.
  • Examine another culture in terms of its core elements, as perceived and organized by anthropologists.
  • Conduct yourself ethically when engaged in anthropological inquiry or intercultural research.
  • Reflect on your own culture analytically with an anthropological perspective.
  • Relate a Christian outlook and an anthropological mindset within a coherent worldview.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 2 papers, 2 Wiki entries, 2 Journal entries, 1 Fieldwork simulation, 3 Practical assignments, and 5 exams.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment is worth between 25 to 75 points, with the exception of the Fieldwork Simulation which is worth 250 points, and the exams are 75 points apiece (100 for the Final Exam) for a total of 1,000 points possible.

Faculty
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Nick Corduan

MA, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2007
Graduate studies, Trinity International University
Graduate studies, University of Indianapolis
BA, Taylor University, 1999

SOC 220 Ethnic and Minority Issues (3 credits)

Course Description

Films are ways of looking at the social constructions that pattern our lives and provide us with glimpses into the forces that shape our social world. Films tell stories—stories of identity, interaction, inequality, and institutions. In this class, students will watch, discuss, process, and deconstruct films using the sociological imagination.

Learning Results

When finished, students should be able to:

  • Understand the theoretical and conceptual foundations of race and ethnic relations.
  • Recognize race and ethnicity as a cross-national and global issue.
  • Illuminate on the structure of social inequality.
  • Provide a foundation for understanding the techniques of dominance, including prejudice and discrimination.
  • Describe the foundations of Anglo, Native, African, Hispanic, and Asian Americans.
  • Discuss the politics of diversity by focusing on issues of religion, class, gender, and multiculturalism.
  • Recognize how religious ideas govern ethnic and minority issues.
  • Discern how images of God continue to inform differing visions of civic life and responsibility.
  • Understand the foundations of racial reconciliation.
  • Use the power of the media to develop a new understanding and appreciation for race/ethnicity.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

Students will watch 14 movies and write 7 reflective essays pertaining to the movies and the readings. There are also 5 participation activities and 1 ethnic autobiography.

Learning Evaluation

Each reflective essay is worth 100 points, the ethnic autobiography is worth 50 points, and the participation activities are each worth 10 points, for a total of 800 points for the course.

Faculty
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Dr. Mike Jessup

PhD, Southern Illinois University, 1992
MS, Iowa State University, 1987
BA, Idaho State University, 1985
BA, Idaho State University, 1985

SOC 313 Statistics for Behavioral Science (3 credits)

Course Description

The major concepts covered in the class will be descriptive statistics, basic probability theory, and inferential statistics. Demonstrations of Microsoft Excel competency will be assigned for each segment of the class.

Learning Results

This course will enable the student to:

  • Understand basic statistical information contained in research papers.
  • Perform basic descriptive statistical operations on their own data.
  • Perform basic inferential statistical operations on their own data.
  • Think critically about the appropriateness of certain statistical tools for various methodological situations.
  • Draw appropriate conclusions from a variety of statistical analyses.
  • Connect principles learned in this class to various aspects of their Christian faith.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 8 assignments, which are divided into 4 modules and 4 exams.

Learning Evaluation

Each module ranges from 20 to 40 points, and the exams are 100 points each for a total of 530 points possible.

Faculty
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Dr. Paul Nesselroade

PhD, University of Louisville, 1998
MA, University of Louisville, 1993
BS, Asbury College, 1989

Social Work

SWK 200 Explorations in Social Work (3 credits)

Course Description

This class is an initial exposure to the field of social work by exploring what social workers are, what social workers do, and the settings in which they work. Examination of the knowledge, value and skill base, practice settings, education and career opportunities, and the interrelationships between social work and social welfare in the United States. Opportunity is given for the student to explore his/her own interest in and potential for a career in social work. Service learning component provides interaction with a variety of community based agencies. 

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate and articulate an introductory knowledge of basic social work settings, systems, fields, levels of social work practice, the planned change process, and social work career opportunities.
  • Integrate their personal values with their professional values and ethics within various settings, programs and classrooms at a beginning generalist level.
  • Understand social justice issues.
  • Demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills to expand and actualize their vision of wholeness to self, others, community, and society.
  • Use effective written and oral professional communication skills.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 10 assignments, a faith integration paper, and a final project. It also requires 15 hours of volunteer work.

Learning Evaluation

The final grade is figured by:
Service learning: 30%
Final project: 20%
Assignments: 30%
Faith integration paper: 20%

Faculty
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Dr. Cathy Harner

PhD, University of Illinois, 1991
MSW, Indiana University, 1984
BS, Philadelphia College of the Bible, 1978

SWK 225 Diversity and the Disenfranchised (3 credits)

Course Description

An online course integrating theory and application of concepts through case study dealing with issues related to diversity, oppression, discrimination, human rights, and social justice. Dimensions related to Women’s Issues, Immigration and Acculturation, Religion and Spirituality, Social Class, and Sexual Orientation will be explored.

Learning Results

This course will enable the student to:

  • Contribute to the understanding, sensitivity, and commitment to social justice.
  • Demonstrate the application of critical thinking within the context of professional social work practice and application to diversity issues.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of personal values and how this impacts interaction with clients, colleagues and community.
  • Evaluate the usefulness of competing theories and models to explain oppression and disenfranchisement.
  • Be able to critique current Christian responses to social needs in the US and globally and advocate for changes that promote a biblically based understanding of social justice.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This class consists of 3 exams, 2 papers, 10 journal entries, and a participation grade.

Learning Evaluation

The exams make up 30% of the final grade, the papers 40%, the journal entries 25%, and the participation 5%.

Faculty
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Deborah Stiles

MSW, University of Kansas, 1994
BSW, Northwest Nazarene University, 1990

SWK 231 Social Welfare: Historical Perspectives & Development (3 credits)

Course Description

This course follows the development of social welfare efforts from early civilization to the present time. The course focuses on the emergence of the profession of social work and explores the question: "Am I my brother's keeper?" in the light of biblical principles.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Understand social welfare as it is distinguished from and relates to public welfare, social work, and sociology.
  • Discuss the historical and Biblical foundations of social welfare and the connections these have to current systems and ideologies.
  • Obtain necessary knowledge base about historical developments of social policy, social research, and social work practice.
  • Describe the impact of social welfare programs upon the less powerful and oppressed groups in our society.
  • Identify personal values and attitudes that may influence one’s understanding of how those in need should receive help.
  • Identify key persons who influenced social welfare and the development of social work as a profession and describe the contributions each made.
  • Demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills.
  • Use professional written communication skills.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 15 assignments including 2 papers, and 4 exams.

Learning Evaluation

Assignments are worth 60% of the grade, papers are 10% each, and exams are 5% each.

Faculty
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Traci Slager

MSW, Indiana University, 2005
BA, Taylor University Fort Wayne, 2001

SWK 320 Unleashing the Oppressed (3 credits)

Course Description

This course is designed to provide the student with the necessary knowledge, values, and skills to empower people who fall into “at-risk population” groups. These groups who are at-risk for prejudice and discrimination typically include mental disability, physical disability, developmental disability, women, elderly, sexual orientation, and religious diversity. The student has the opportunity to meet and learn from people who are members of several of these diversity groups. Service learning component creates opportunities for direct involvement with these population groups.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course:

  • Students will be exposed to a variety of viewpoints, experiences and opportunities in the classroom, department and external settings.
  • Students demonstrate the ability to use effective oral professional communication skills.
  • Students will have a comprehensive understanding of social justice issues.
  • Students are able to integrate their personal values with their professional values and ethics within various settings, programs and classrooms at a beginning generalist level.
  • Students will participate in external learning experiences that integrate learning in the community, promote awareness of professional or community issues and develop a commitment of service to others.
  • Students will holistically integrate theory, practice, beliefs and values while recognizing and responding to human systems in need.
  • Students will demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills to expand and actualize their vision of wholeness to self, others, community and society.
  • Students will master and integrate the knowledge base regarding human behavior and the social environment and social policy.
  • Students will demonstrate professional conduct.
  • Students will demonstrate understanding of and tolerance for differences based on gender, ethnicity, religious creed, sexual orientation and age.
  • Students will competently link people with systems that provide people with services, opportunities and resources.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course includes:  Module Discussion Questions, a textbook response paper, a Service Learning Project, a Service Learning Summary Paper, and a Final Paper.

Learning Evaluation

The final grade is figured by:
Module discussion questions: 30%
Textbook response paper: 10%
Service learning project: 30%
Service learning summary paper: 20%
Final paper: 10%

Faculty
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Dr. Cathy Harner

PhD, University of Illinois, 1991 MSW, Indiana University, 1984 BS, Philadelphia College of the Bible, 1978

SWK 355 Helping Troubled Families (3 credits)

Course Description

This course is one of four courses in the social work practice sequence that prepare graduates for generalist social work practice. The specific focus of this course is working with families. The course will explore the variations found in modern families and focus on some of the more common difficulties family units experience. The course will provide theoretical frameworks that help understand the causes and dynamics of the various situations including homelessness, substance abuse, domestic violence, sexual abuse, and sustained conflict. It will also provide students with appropriate beginning level professional social work skills to help intervene in situations needing professional help.

Learning Results

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

  • Understand and critique the various definitions and characteristics of the contemporary family.
  • Develop a biblical framework for helping families in distress that is consistent with professional values and ethics.
  • Be able to apply essential elements of selected social work intervention approaches to families in distress.
  • Gain a basic understanding of various contemporary approaches to working with troubled families.
  • Understand the impact that diversity and oppression has on the way families function and are helped.
  • Have a better understanding of one's own family of origin and develop an awareness of self and family that uses strengths and weaknesses to improve current and future family relationships.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use professional written communication skills.
  • Use the critical thinking skills required for assessment and intervention required when working with families.

Textbooks
Learning Documentation

This course consists of 7 assignments plus one research paper and one exam.

Learning Evaluation

Each assignment is 100 points, except one worth 150 points. The paper is another 150 points and the exam is 100 for a total of 1,000 points possible.

Faculty
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Traci Slager

MSW, Indiana University, 2005
BA, Taylor University Fort Wayne, 2001