Physics and Engineering

Real-world preparation. ABET-accredited. Graduate-level research.

Our ABET-accredited Engineering Physics program provides state-of-the-art equipment and quality education to prepare you for graduate-level research at NASA or the Air Force as an undergraduate student, summer internships at places such as Stanford and the Mayo Clinic, and job opportunities at companies like CERN.

Most importantly, you will have access to all these opportunities while being mentored by faculty who are passionate about helping you integrate your faith into all you do, wherever God is calling you—whether that’s working in government, health care, education, or the mission field.

Take the next step

Watch Dr. Bob Davis as he tells you about the equipment you will learn to use to perform research.

Watch Dr. Bob Davis, a professor in the Physics and Engineering Department, as he tells you about the equipment you will learn to use to perform research.

Interested? Look over our degrees and majors.  Better yet, come visit campus and take a tour of the Euler Science Complex.

Physics & Engineering news Icon:RSS

Taylor Science Seminar Series Continues Monday

Published: September 25, 2015

Sustainable land management, public health emergencies, medical missions, urban gardens, and bridging science, ethics and religion are among the topics being covered during the Annual Natural Sciences Seminar, a series of Monday afternoon lectures and presentations hosted by Taylor University’s Department of Natural Sciences each Monday during the Fall Semester.

Satellite With Taylor Ties Launched from International Space Station

Published: March 05, 2015

A small satellite designed and built by a Grant County company with Taylor University ties is in low-earth orbit following its release Tuesday evening from the International Space Station.

Air Force Selects Taylor Satellite for Launch

Published: March 04, 2015

The United States Air Force has selected ELEOsat, a small satellite designed by Taylor University students, for launch into low-orbit.

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