A Christian Liberal Arts University, Est. 1846

Kevin Johnson

Assistant Professor of History
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Faculty Profile

Advice to incoming students

Consider your academic efforts as an act of worship to God. As Jesus says in Matthew 22:37: "Love the Lord your God with all of your heart, and with all your soul, and with all of your mind." Most Christians have no problem loving God with their hearts and souls, but it is also important that they be transformed by the renewing of their minds as an act of worship for God's glory (Romans 12:2). Understand that all truth is God's truth, and what you learn here can be applied in many ways to make an impact in this world for Christ.

Why I Came to Taylor

I came to Taylor because I believe wholeheartedly in the importance of a Christian liberal arts education. It encourages self-examination, an understanding of a variety of issues, and disciplined thinking. It also demands humility, the realization that other viewpoints may have validity and thus should not be so easily dismissed. It invites students to think globally, to consider the world around them and their place in the Church at large. Of paramount importance is the integration of faith into the classroom. To that end, I believe that Christian colleges like Taylor are in a unique position to go beyond the aims of secular universities, where ultimately the spiritual well-being and development of the student is of little importance, and the academic development of the student is the singular goal. Well-educated individuals without a moral compass to guide them in the many decisions they will make in their lives are, I believe, distinctly disadvantaged. Taylor's mission of developing the whole person is something I am excited to be a part of.

Hobbies

I enjoy watching college football, playing tennis, discussing theology over coffee, reading a good biography, and spending time with my girls. I am always on the lookout for a great film recommendation!

Major career accomplishments

My research agenda centers on the late 19th and early 20th dynasties in Egypt, addressing global issues of legitimacy, political machinations of figures behind the throne, and problems of succession and transition of power. I am the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Egyptian History and the popular-level book The Names of the Kings of Egypt. I have also led a number of academic tours to Egypt, primarily in Cairo and Luxor, and participated in an archaeological season for the University of Arizona at the mortuary temple of one of Egypt's few female rulers, Tausret.