Felix Aguilar
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Dr. Felix Aguilar

Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) Department
Systems Curriculum

 

     
     

Director of the Systems Curriculum & Professor of Computer Science & Engineering

Office Location: Euler 210
Phone: (765) 998-5164
Email: flaguilar@tayloru.edu

Specialties: computational fluid dynamics, commercial nuclear reactor safety analysis, engineering automation, business process improvement, enterprise resource planning, information technology management

 

Education:

Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, 1976
M.S., Mathematics, Virginia Tech, 1973
M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, 1969
B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, 1967


Why I Love Teaching At Taylor:

It is a real honor—and a surprise—to be a professor at Taylor. Christ came into my life after I turned 30. My education was complete (PhD in mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech), my career launched, and my wife and children were the center of my life. As a scientifically trained person, I thought Christian belief and reason to be utterly at odds: “For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing” (1 Corinthians 1:18). Through a series of miracles and the evangelism of a fellow engineer in the workplace, the Lord brought me to Himself. What had been foolish to me became profoundly rational. That’s why I love being at Taylor. Our ethic is integration of faith and learning, and it is far more than a slogan.


Advice to Incoming Students:

Get the very best education you can at Taylor. Don’t shy away from hard courses because they’re not “fun”. These courses ultimately will enable you to have a “fun” professional life after graduation. Some students obsess on GPA and won’t put theirs at risk by taking tough courses. A low GPA certainly paints an unflattering portrait: passionless and undisciplined. A high GPA paints a very positive portrait of discipline. But even a 4.0 is not necessarily a reliable indicator of the ability to learn hard concepts on your own after college or put concepts from diverse fields together. These are attributes I prized when I hired professional people in industry. St. Paul said: “…we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope.” Suffering perhaps isn’t the right word for the disappointment of earning a C+ in a hard course you put your all into, but St. Paul’s life principle is applicable. You will grow in perseverance, character, and hope. And real “fun” in life is all about having hope.


Hobbies:

Sailing, reading