Taylor Theatre Presents Cyrano de Bergerac

By Kenzie Nevins Published: Nov 06, 2017

Taylor Theatre presents Edmond Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac, translated by Anthony Burgess, on November 10-11 and 17-18 at 7:30 pm, and November 12 and 19 at 2:00 pm in Taylor University’s Mitchell Theatre. 

Dashing, proud, and romantic, Cyrano is one of the most memorable figures in theatre history. Known throughout Paris for his unmatched bravery and the charm of his verse, poet Cyrano de Bergerac has one problem - his enormous nose. During an age of gallant musketeers and extravagant lifestyles, this beautiful soul is cursed by his marred appearance. Not one to give up, Cyrano joins forces with the handsome but slow-witted soldier, Christian, to woo Roxane, the woman they both love. With Christian’s looks and Cyrano’s soul they quickly win her heart, but can Cyrano watch his beloved marry someone else? Equally hilarious and tragic, Edmond Rostand's classic verse play is one of the most popular romances to ever grace the stage.

“The themes explored in Cyrano are absolutely timeless,” says director Terrance Volden. “As audience members, we are drawn into Cyrano’s lifelong attempt to balance love, honor, loyalty, and self. We also are subtly asked to determine what makes a person beautiful. Is it their outer self? Inner self? Personality? Talent? I’m thrilled to be able to bring so many of my loves and interests together in one production. We had a class last semester about commedia characters and stage combat. This show allows the students to display those skills while being exposed to one of the greatest works of literature ever written. Swords, combat, food, love, and comedy. What more could one ask for in an evening of entertainment?”

Purchase tickets through Taylor University Theatre’s website, Facebook and Twitter pages, or contact the box office at 765-998-5289 or boxoffice@taylor.edu.

Taylor Theatre provides an immersive experience for audiences and participants by pursuing excellence on and off the stage, embracing difficulty and asking questions in pursuit of truth.